FootBall – What You Need To Do To Ensure That You Are Prepared

WHAT you need to do to ensure that you are as prepared as you could
possibly be the first time you step out onto that field.

(For reference sake, we are going to assume that the reason you want to prepare yourself for soccer is so that you can be ready when you go up against competition for a spot on the team for the very first time. We realize that this may not necessarily be the case; there are a number of leagues that do not require that their players audition, and if you happen to play for one of these leagues it doesn’t matter; the information we are going to relay below is going to apply just as accurately to your situation as well.)

In order to prepare yourself to play soccer you are going to have to
build a fitness regime based upon ten key elements:

1) You are going to need to build up the strength and endurance of your
leg and arm muscles in order to ensure that they will not falter
halfway through a game and send you sprawling on your face on the
field with exhaustion.

2) You are going to need to improve your cardiovascular conditioning,
making it easier for your body to get the oxygen it needs to keep
going and preventing you from becoming tired too quickly.

3) You are going to need to learn what foods to eat and which foods
should be avoided in the interest of helping you to bulk up your
muscles and decrease the fat content of your body, making it easier
for you to increase your metabolism and get in shape.

4) You will need to eliminate all habits which are negatively affecting
your health from your lifestyle.

5) You will have to establish a firm work-out routine that works all of your body’s systems to their maximum capabilities.

6) You will need to stop eating certain foods that are touted as being
healthy for you but are actually only serving to exert a negative effect
on your body’s well being.

7) Throughout the course of your fitness training you will discover that
all of your body’s systems are interrelated, and why it is therefore
essential that you discover how to achieve the best results from each
one to help you to perform at your best when you get out on the
soccer field.

8) Of course, there’s more to getting fit to play soccer than simply
getting fit. You need to know how to play as well! We’ll give you a
list of easy soccer related drills that will help you to become
comfortable with the ball and your role on the playing field so that
you will be prepared when you walk in on that first day.

9) As sports related injuries are incredibly common, particularly when
you are playing a contact sport like soccer which focuses primarily
on a single location on your body, we will briefly touch on the
subject of injuries, playing while injured and how to rehabilitate an
injury to help you get out on the field as quickly as possible, and
finally

10) The single most important part of playing any sport is to make it fun,
and that includes your workouts as well! We’ll show you a couple of
zany activities which will help you to get in shape while enjoying
yourself at the same time.

Great South Athletic Conference

Great South Athletic Conference

The Great South Athletic Conference (GSAC) was an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions were located nationwide, but was originally based in the southeastern United States.

It was founded in 1999 as a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III member institutions from the Southeast with similar academic and athletic interests.

Charter members included Fisk University, LaGrange College, Maryville College, Piedmont College and Stillman College. In 2002, Huntingdon College and women’s colleges Agnes Scott College and Wesleyan College were granted membership. In 2003, Spelman College and Wesleyan (Ga.) were admitted to the GSAC on a provisional basis and given full membership status in 2005. Salem College, a women’s school in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, became the conference’s eighth member for the 2009-10 season. Covenant College, located on top of Lookout Mountain in northwest Georgia, joined the conference in Spring 2010 and began playing in Fall 2010, while completing its requirements for NCAA Division III provisional status.

Stillman, a charter member, dropped out of the conference following the 2001-02 season, now currently competing in the NCAA Division II Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC); while Fisk, another charter member, dropped out of the conference following the 2005-06 season, to compete in the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC) of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

Three schools (also charter members of the GSAC) left for the USA South Athletic Conference beginning with the 2012-13 season: Piedmont, LaGrange and Maryville. Pine Manor College and Trinity Washington University joined the conference in the 2012-13 season to replace those schools. Due to the lack of men’s athletic programs in the GSAC, the conference stopped sponsoring men’s sports championships at the end of the 2011-12 season.

On May 10, 2012, Covenant College and Huntingdon College announced plans to leave the Great South and join USA South Athletic Conference beginning in the 2013-14 season. In the 2012-13 season, the Covenant and Huntingdon women’s sports competed as full members of the GSAC, while their men’s sports competed as NCAA Division III independents.

On November 1, 2012, Spelman College announced that they will be dropping all intercollegiate sports at the end of the 2012-13 academic year.

On January 14, 2013, the GSAC announced that Mills College, Finlandia University, and the University of Maine at Presque Isle will join the GSAC in 2013-14. Finlandia and Maine-Presque Isle are co-educational colleges. The women’s sports will join the GSAC, while the men’s sports at the two schools will remain Division III Independents.

On May 6, 2015, the USA South Athletic Conference announced that Agnes Scott College, Salem College, and Wesleyan College will be leaving the GSAC and joining the USA South beginning in the 2016-2017 season.

On June 11, 2015, the GSAC announced that Mount Mary University and UC Santa Cruz would be joining the conference in women’s soccer, volleyball, women’s basketball, softball (Mount Mary only) and tennis (UC Santa Cruz only).  The move was made effective immediately. Both schools were formerly affiliate members, playing tennis in the GSAC since 2013.

Following the move of Agnes Scott, Salem, and Wesleyan to the USA South, the GSAC dissoved in the summer of 2016. The GSAC held its last conference championships in April, 2016.

Check the full details of GSAC history and member schools in Wikipedia thru this link.

Women In Olympic Sports

Women In Olympic Sports

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) promotes women in sports in an effort to increase participation in the games as well recognition of the well being of women and girls in sports at all levels of sports and different structures within sports.

This is consistent with the Olympic charter which promotes equality within sports of men and women by including both genders in these competitions.

The IOC as well as the International Federations (IFS) and National Olympic Committees (NOCs) have been committed to the mandates of this Olympic charter. Multiple measures have been taken toward increasing the participation of women at governing and administrative levels as well as training and education toward women in sport and the supporting administrative structures.

Since 1991, all new sports asking to be included in the Olympic program must feature women’s events. The 2012 Olympic Games in London were the first Olympics where every participating country included female athletes. They were also the first Olympics in which women competed in all sports in the program. Women have competed in the Olympics since 1900, following an all-male Games in 1896.

According to The International Olympic Committee’s List of Women’s Sports , these were the following years every new woman’s sport was introduced.

The first women’s sports were in 1900, which were tennis and golf.

The next 3 Olympics added archery (1904), tennis and figure skating (1908), and swimming (1912).

The next sports were not added until twelve-sixteen years later, fencing (1924) and gymnastics (1928).

The second winter sport added to women’s sport was alpine skiing in 1936.

Another long twelve to sixteen years later, canoeing was added in 1948 and equestrian sports in 1952.

Two Olympics following, speed skating was added to the games in 1960. The following Olympics volleyball and luge were added in 1964; rowing, basketball, and handball were added in 1976; field hockey was added in 1980; shooting and cycling were introduced in 1984.

The next two Olympic terms included 6 more women’s sports, tennis, table tennis, sailing in 1988 and badminton, judo, biathlon in 1992. In 1996, football and softball; in 1998, curling and ice hockey; in 2000, weightlifting, penthalon, taekwondo, and triathlon, in 2002, bobsleighing was added; in 2004, wrestling; in 2008, BMX.

The last updated women’s sports included in the Olympic games according to the IOC are boxing (2012) and ski jumping (2014).

Source : Wikipedia